Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Beschbarmak - Boiled Duck and Onions with Lasagna Pasta

I have done a little research on beschbarmak, and it seems to originate with the nomadic Turkic people of Central Asia.

Beschbarmak can also be made with beef short rib and rack of mutton or lamb, and may also be dressed with potatoes as well as onions. The pasta is usually home made in large sheets, but you can use fresh lasagna or papparadelle as a substitute.

This recipe video is in German with Russian subtitles, but I'm sure you will get the gist. I will do my best to translate below.

 

Method:

First cut the duck in half and place it in a large cooking pot. Top up with water and a couple of teaspoons of salt. Bring the duck to a boil and reduce to simmer, skimming off the foam as it rises to the surface. Cook for approximately 2 hours or until the duck meat is tender and juicy. Drain and set aside the duck.

Boil two peeled and sliced brown onions in some of the duck stock until soft and tender.

Cook the pasta in the duck stock, replenishing the water where necessary.

Shred the duck meat from the carcass and keep it warm.

Drain the cooked pasta and arrange it on a large serving plate.

Dress with the shredded duck meat and top with the cooked onions and a drizzle of the cooking broth.

Serving:

Beschbarmak means 'five fingers' and is traditionally eaten with the fingers.

Enjoy!


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"Hospitality is serious business in Central Asia. Ordinarily, being invited for beshbarmak is an honor. Guests are never invited to sit at an empty table, but beshbarmak is always presented after all the guests have been assembled. It is still a dish that carries with it nomadic identity, and not one to be taken lightly." ~ Wikipedia

Sunday, 22 October 2017

Thursday, 28 September 2017

Monday, 23 January 2017

Asian at Home | Egg Drop Soup

Brown Sugar & Pineapple Glazed Ham | Taste of Trini

Taste of Trini uses a lot of cloves in this recipe, but don't be put off, it really works!



Unable to find the cinnamon bay used here, I had to resort to the little bay laurel in my back yard.

Taste of Trini's recipes are as reliable as those of Delia Smith, and she works wonders using a small kitchen.